Potential of eucalypt trees for remediation of contaminated soils

The use of trees to immobilize contaminants (phytostabilization) is a low-cost and effective method of soil remediation.

Researchers of IRNAS, CSIC and New Zealand have evaluated the potential of red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) to phytostabilize soils contaminated by trace elements (TE). Within the research project RESTECO, the ET concentration in soils and in eucalypt leaves and flowers has been investigated in 7 sites along the Gudiamar River valley. In general, the concentration of elements such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in aboveground tissues was relatively low, and lower than toxic levels.

Eucalyptus camaldulensis is a fast-growing tree with a large root system; because of its tolerance to TE contamination and the low transfer of metals towards the aboveground tissues it can be considered suitable for phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

In addition, there was significant correlation between the concentration of Cd, Mn and Zn (but neither for Cu nor Pb) in their leaves and in the rhizosphere. Therefore, the eucalypt´s leaves may serve as bioindicators of the soil contamination for Cd, Mn and Zn.

The study has been published on June 30th 2017 in the open access journal PLOS ONE.

Madejón P, Marañón T, Navarro-Fernández CM, Domínguez MT, Alegre JM, Robinson B, Murillo JM (2017) Potential of Eucalyptus camaldulensis for phytostabilization and biomonitoring of trace-element contaminated soils. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0180240.